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Susan and I have been fascinated by the dozens of sculptures presented as public art in Puerto Vallarta .  I previously wrote a post about them.  But yesterday we went on a photo-shoot to capture head-shots and head details of the sculptures along the Malecon.

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“La Rotunda del Mar” (“The Rotunda of the Sea”) by Alejandro Colunga, 1997

I wanted to show this small fellow first.  He was one of nine small sculptures circling a display of gigantic figures. Each of the giants was also a seat. Passers-by can sit on their laps.  But these little fellows surrounding the giants are often overlooked because of their short stature.  Yet look at the beautiful simplicity of form and the expression of concern on the concave face.  Not to mention the colour and textures.

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“La Rotunda del Mar” (“The Rotunda of the Sea”) by Alejandro Colunga, 1997

This chap is some kind of deep-sea diver.  What most don’t notice is that his diving helmet is made of fish and geckos. A strange diver to be sure. 

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“La Nostalgia” (“Nostalgia”) by Ramiz Barquet, 1984

This couple has long been our favourite sculpture on the Malecon.  The couple also form a seat. It’s fun to sit on their shiny laps.  I can’t look at the shape of the heads and negative space between the two heads and necks without sighing.  Such beautiful flowing shapes, and the two are so bound together, even by the space between them. Something deeper to think about in this.  The blue of the Pacific sky is the perfect backdrop.  For their true story click here (Vallarta Sculptures)

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“The Millenium” by Mathis Lídice, 2001

This is Nezahualcoyotl, the poet-king of Texcoco in 15th century Mexico. He seems to be half skull and half fully fleshed out head.  Could this be a message for all of us of the inevitability of death even as we live our very fleshy lives? The face in the centre of his hat seems not a happy character.

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That’s him again, up there!  Many of these shots had to be taken with a 400mm zoom lens.

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“The Millenium” by Mathis Lídice, 2001

This female is at the top of the sculpture and has a dove in her outstretched hand

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“El Sutil Comepiedras” (“The Subtle Rock-Eater”) by Jonas Gutiérrez, 2006

This interesting person looks intent on swallowing the fruit whole. I love the exaggerated features and his concentration on getting the fruit in just the right place.  Any guesses as to which tropical fruit he is about to eat? The name of the sculpture is He Who Eats the Subtle Stone… When we find out more I will let you know.

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Sea-Horse Head

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Sea Horse Detail

This is a detail of the head of a stylized sea-horse. It’s squared form is such a contrast to the mainly rounded and flowing forms of the other sculptures in the area. If you get close enough you can see the swirls of the textured design that makes the figure so interesting to look at and to feel.  And that’s another thing, all the sculptures are touchable.  Some designed to be sat on – others to be climbed. It’s wonderful to see little children and some at the other end of the age spectrum ‘playing’ and interacting with these figures.  (Could be another photo-shoot in it – thanks Muse).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis is the head of a merman.  He is part of a couple and his gaze is directed at the eyes of the mermaid.  The intensity of his gaze and the determination go so well with the strength implied by the flowing hair and beard. It’s actually “Triton and the Nereid” by Carlos Espino, 1990

Hair from the side

Hair from the side

Our mermaid friend – seems more pensive,

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Full frontal mermaid

ooking up

Looking up

What a honker

What a honker

This is one of the figures from “La Rotunda del Mar” (“The Rotunda of the Sea”) by Alejandro Colunga, 1997 as are the next seven images. They form a circle of figures.

Is this Pisces?

Is this Pisces? If you know your constellations or zodiac signs – let me know if this is Pisces.  The fish seems to suggest that.

Diver 2

Diver 2

Diverse diver

Diverse diver

Diver's mask

Diver’s mask

Something fishy about this mask…dadada ta boom! Thank you. Well it would be good enough for the Letterman show.

Eye-deal

Eye-deal

There is a sculpture in this set that is a seat with two huge ears as the backs – along the edge of the seat are a series of eyes.  They seem to be weeping, or maybe its just allergies.

Octo-nose rolling his eye

Octo-nose rolling his eye

Octo-nose

Octo-nose – my name (for him, not MY name, although some in the family might think it fitting)

Mouth detail

“In Search of Reason” by Sergio Bustamante, 1999 Mouth detail

Calling

“In Search of Reason” by Sergio Bustamante, 1999 – calling

Honcho and Blossoms

Honcho and Blossoms

This sculpture is in the square with the bandstand.  I forgot to look to see who it is. Next time…

Important Honcho

Important Honcho

Whoever he is, here he is again.

Male Folkloric Dancer

Male Folkloric Dancer

Female Folkloric Dancer

Female Folkloric Dancer

Grace 1

“Caballero del Mar” (“The Seahorse”) by Rafael Zamarripa, 1976

Famous Golf PLayer

Famous Golf Player -yes, yes, I’ll check her name next time I pass by…

The Ear of a Saint

The Ear of a Saint

Woman Washing Clothes

Woman Washing Clothes

There is great power in this piece depicting a woman washing clothes in the traditional way, by a stream, on rocks.  Its colours change and reflect the sun as it sets in the late afternoon.

I hope you have enjoyed this tour of Vallarta faces.  The more we look the more we see. The more we take the camera, the more we look.