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For a few weeks every summer Lake Winnipeg produces millions of fishflies.  If Wikipedia is correct and I am reading it properly the proper name for our fishflies is chauliodes pectinicornis.  At first glance these can be rather alarming, especially when they land on you.  They are however quite harmless and can be removed by carefully grasping the wings and sending them into the air.

One fishfly on the wall is ok, 10,000 gets a bit annoying

One fishfly on the wall is ok, 10,000 gets a bit annoying

Almost pretty against the purple

Almost pretty against the purple

They have a short life once they emerge from the larvae stage.  Apparently they are in a mid-stage when they arrive at our place overnight and then emerge as adults, shrugging off their old skins.

Over night the fishflies shrug off their old outer bodies and leave the remains behind

Over night the fishflies shrug off their old outer bodies and leave the remains behind

At the edge of the lake there are heaps of discarded bodies.  They get the name fishfly, not because they are food for fish, but because a mass of the decaying bodies can provide a lovely fishy odour.

There is something magical about this strange creatures.

Not a great photo, but I like the sense of a fantasy world

Not a great photo, but I like the sense of a fantasy world

The dragon flies come out in great numbers during fishfly season – it’s quite amazing to see them snatch a fishfly out of the air and carry it off.  Unfortunately they sometimes like to land on a human or near one and start to devour the fish fly – starting with the head.  Not a pretty sight.

Posing on driftwood

Posing on driftwood

I hope the season is over shortly, I am tired of having to pick them off the wall – or use the leaf-blower to send them on their way each day.

Next up will be some lovely fungi.  It was a good week for a fun guy – ok ok I know – let it go.

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