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We start our England and Scotland travelogue in Essex, at the home of our Daughter and Son-in-law, and travel onto Hyde Hall, operated by the Royal Horticultural Society.  But first a word from our sponsors – Ruby and Crystal – the powers behind the throne!

Ruby

Ruby

Crystal

Crystal

Ruby

Ruby

Flower in Ruby and Crystal's Garden

Flower in Ruby and Crystal’s Garden

Essex isn’t always treated with respect among the English, but it has some beautiful countryside and many places of interest.  Fairly close to where we are staying is Hyde Hall, a country estate with a great variety of garden types.  So our journey begins in this  lovely setting with a few photographs to whet the appetite.

Moss on Trees by Pond

Moss on Tree by Pond

I really love the colours of the mosses and the patterns of the tree bark.

Red Hot Pokers at Hyde Hall

Red-Hot Pokers at Hyde Hall

These flowers were a favourite of mine growing up.  The common name is so perfect.

Dry-Land Grasses

Dry-Land Grasses

There is a part of the garden set aside for species that grow in arid conditions.  The grasses are quite spectacular.

Hyde Hall Gazania

Hyde Hall Gazania

We grew gazanias at the cabin this year – for the first time – now everywhere we go we see gazillions of gazanias. I can’t believe I was oblivious to this variety until this year.

Hyde Hall - Black-Eyed Susan

Hyde Hall – Black-Eyed Susan?

Is this a Black-eyed Susan?  Such a beauty whatever its name

Virginia Creeper starting it's autumn colours

Virginia Creeper starting it’s autumn colours

One of the old buildings at Hyde Hall was covered in Virginia Creeper that was just getting its autumnal colours.

Bark of the Cork Tree at Hyde Hall

Bark of the Cork Tree at Hyde Hall

We saw a tree with a number of wine corks hanging from it.  I didn’t know corks were the fruit of the cork tree – and it turns out they are not.  It’s just another rumour like the Treacle Mine and the Fog Factory. They were hung there to indicate one of the products made from this amazing bark.  Sorry it’s a bit fuzzy. What do you expect after emptying so many bottles of wine to get corks to display.

Crocus at Hyde Hall

Crocus at Hyde Hall  CORRECTION I am told by DL these are actually Colchicums also  known as Autumn Crocus – although a different species.

These little guys were poking up out of the grass.  They look like crocuses to me but could be anemones or something else entirely.  By now you will realize I am not a botanist. But like the man said “I know what I like”. DL says they are Colchicums

An additional shot of the crocus - no leaves - for Tracy Lee

An additional shot of the crocus (Colchicum) – no leaves – for Tracy Lee

Delicate blossoms at Hyde Hall

Delicate blossoms at Hyde Hall

Here is another blooming lovely – such a delicate petal and pattern.

We ended our walk through Hyde Hall with still much to see.  It’s one of those places to visit frequently.

Next stop on our tour is Haddo House in Scotland.  We flew up to Edinburgh by Queasy Jet – so I may get a little distracted speaking about that adventure first.

If anyone knows the proper names for any of the flowers in this post please let me know in the comments.

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